Tag Archives: university

Life Hacks: How to Be A Grown Up


As we go through university, we learn a lot about ourselves, our parents, and our friends. One of the things I’ve always been looking for is a How-To guide on how to be a grown up. Like, the little things that your mom knows to do when you spill red wine on your carpet, or when you need to take Advil vs. Tylenol. Most of us look on Google for answers, but then there’s the bigger, anxiety-ridden, what-am-I-going-to-do-with-my-life questions that don’t exactly have an easy click-through solution.

I’m with you on this.

Since we’re both students, I figured I’d do some research into the matter, and present you with my findings. This is only the beginning. By the end of the next 4 months (I would say 4 weeks, but hey, I’m an undergrad = not too much spare time for blogging) I hope to leave you – students of the world – with some Life Hacks, some tips and tricks, and some overall ANXIETY-REDUCING ideas for how to cope with life in general.

That’s the plan. In the meantime, here ‘s a few I Wish I’d Thought of That tips from my personal life over the past 4 years to start you off:

Thanks for reading! Stay tuned for next week’s Life Hacks: How to Be A Grown Up. Leave a comment below if you’d like to join the discussion, I’m open for it if you are.

— Sarah Witiuk
P.S. You can follow me on twitter @SarahWitiuk and pinterest.

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No matter how big or soft or warm your bed is, you still have to get out of it. – Grace Slick

Quote of the Day

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Quote of the Day


Don’t delay being happy until the future. What can you do to be happy today? Right now?

Happiness in the palm of your hand

Happiness in the palm of your hand. Credit: Pinterest

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Quote of the Day


“I believe I was put on earth to cause a ruckus.” ~ Lady GaGa

Lady Gaga Telephone

Lady Gaga, Credit: Google Images

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Advice for Students


Try to keep your focus inward and don’t compare yourself to others. You are exactly where you should be.

Keep calm and Stay Positive

Source: Pinterest

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“But I’m only an Undergrad…”


University: the best years of your life – packed with parties, late nights at the library, cramming for tests, and getting your first A on a paper. What more could you ask for?

Among all the partying and cramming, it might be tough to think that at the end of these 3 or 4 years, you’re actually going to be entering the “real world” – and I’m not talking about the outrageous MTV reality show.

If you’re going into your final year this fall, you’ll probably start to feel the heat – career fairs left, right and centre, all your friends applying to Med School or Grad School, and your aunts and uncles constantly asking you what your “life plan” is. Your heart is racing, you’re feeling dizzy, a voice deep down inside keeps chanting:

What do I really want to do after I graduate?

If the answer to that question is making you draw a blank, then we’ve got news for you. This long-kept secret has been passed down from generation to generation of competitive overachievers, and now we’re telling you. Imagine a way you can not only find out what you want to do, but also talk to company recruiters or researchers, meet new people, win prize money, and also have fun doing it….

The answer: Student events.

Student events – competitions, conferences, or seminars – are an incredible resource to get ahead during your undergrad and also ease your anxiety about the future. By participating in a local, national, or global event, you get the chance to network with savvy intellectuals, and even ask people how they got to be where they are now.

When you participate in an event, you’re opening doors to lots of different opportunities – from internships, to finding a mentor, to winning some prizes or even cold hard cash (thank you PSYC 101 term paper!)

The best part? There are literally thousands of events out there waiting for you to try out.

So the question is…. are you looking for them?

*Did you know? A new trend showing up in today’s job market is to add an Events section to your resume, right next to your Education and Work Experience. Events show your future employer that you are ambitious, motivated, and involved – all traits of a great employee.

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Quote of the Day


Advice from a college grad on how to spend your university years:

“I wish I knew I was supposed to be taking risks and getting lost–not trying to settle down and find a job.”

 

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Quote of the Day


“Eat. Sleep. Exercise. Try as much as possible to be wholly alive with all your might, and when you laugh, laugh like hell.”

For more inspirational quotes, follow @SarahWitiuk on twitter.

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Quote of the Day


“You can either choose to own the day or let the day own you.”

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Four reasons finishing fourth year sucks


Post by Kieran Slobodin, Vice-President (University Affairs) at Queen’s University, Kingston.

Reblogged from: http://myams.org/news/ams-blog/four-reasons-finishing-fourth-year-sucks.aspx

April has always been a month of renewal.  The bright rays of the April sun are the first glimmer of hope after the doldrums of a dreary winter and turn our minds to rejuvenation.  April is when our parks fill up and our porches become occupied full time.  Yes, April is like a Star Wars sequel: A New Hope.

Unless you’re in fourth year, in which case it blows.

4. We’re still ‘technically’ students

On the last day of classes my house threw a party.  Thursday, April 5, last day of classes.  Last day of undergrad.  Perhaps the last day of classes for all time (screw you, Grad School!).  All that week facebook statuses were popping up with ‘last class!’ or ‘last seminar’ or ‘last Alfie’s night of my undergrad!’ Everyone was ecstatic and some people invested more time creating Facebook groups than they actually spent in class those final four days.  Like freed prisoners we celebrated that night.

The Reality?

Like four exams.  And two final papers.  And a film project.  Literally no one was done anything and the extended weekend of Easter only helped perpetuate that lie.  Like a dark hangover cloud fourth year students are starting to realize that they still have to buckle down one last time and study hard.  Unless you were blessed with a shortened semester you are still resigned to one last study blitz.  Perhaps you only wish to pass the course and only need 8% on that 40% weight final to get your pass.  But most likely you’re going to be faced with the same dilemma you were your other seven exam periods: you didn’t go to class and you have no idea what the course is about.

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When the hell did I sign for Ayn Rand and Postmodern Epistomology: A Comparative Review?! Photo credit: QuickMeme.

3. Bucket Lists

Bucket lists as a concept were first perpetuated by Morgan Freeman and Jack Nicholson as a way to cheat death.  Or make the most out of life. One of those.  A bucket list as portrayed in the movie is essentially just a macabre wish list.  However, ever since the Bucket List, arguably Morgan Freeman’s worst movie after Evan Almighty, there has not been a more tired cliché for graduating students.

Groosfrabas. Photo credit: Blogspot.

Bucket lists symbolize a last push by panicking students to capture every memory they can of university.  The thought is that with a year of dedicated effort you can achieve in your final year what you failed to do in your first three.

The Reality?

There’s a reason you never did any of your bucket list in the first 75% of your undergraduate career.  Whether it’s because your list is too challenging or too much work, you quickly realize that trying to capture stave off your inevitable nostalgia is sadder than Madonna trying to stay relevant.

The problem is when you try and cram in three years of missed opportunity you forget what makes the stuff you DID do fun.  The point of the university experiences that typically wind up on bucket lists is the story behind the accomplishment.  When you reduce those stories down to a checklist they tend to lose all meaning.

Continue reading this story here…

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Freaky Test: Are you 2% or 98% of the population?


Are you the 2% or 98% of the population?

Follow the instructions.

(NO PEEKING AHEAD!) Free will or synaptic wiring? You be the judge.

Do the following exercise, guaranteed to raise an eyebrow. There’s no trick or surprise.

Just follow these instructions, and answer the questions one at a time and as quickly as you can! Again, as quickly as you can but don’t advance until you’ve done each of them …. really.

Now, scroll down (but not too fast, you might miss something).

THINK of a number from 1 to 10 – got it?

scroll down until you see the next instruction

 

MULTIPLY that number by 9 – scroll down

If the number is a 2-digit number, ADD the digits together – scroll down

Now SUBTRACT 5 – scroll down

DETERMINE which letter in the alphabet corresponds to the number

you ended up with (example: 1=a, 2=b, 3=c,etc.) – scroll down

THINK of a country that starts with that letter – scroll down

THINK of the last letter of the name of that country – scroll down

THINK of the name of an animal that starts with that letter – scroll down

REMEMBER the last letter in the name of that animal – scroll down

THINK of the name of a fruit that starts with that letter – scroll down

Are you thinking of a Kangaroo in Denmark eating an Orange?

I told you this was FREAKY!! At least for me it was. If not for you, you’re among the 2% of the population whose minds are different enough to think of something else. 98% of people will answer with kangaroos in Denmark eating oranges when given this exercise. Freaky, huh?

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Begin somewhere; you cannot build a reputation on what you intend to do.

Liz Smith

Just Start

Quote of the Day

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Airbus – Fly Your Ideas Challenge


By Arush Chandna

 

The Airbus-Fly Your Ideas Challenge was one of the most enriching experiences of my life. Thanks to this competition, I got to work on a really cool idea, with two very intellectual peers under the guidance of a really inspirational and experienced mentor.

 

Since a very young age, I have possessed a penchant for aviation. One day, as I was browsing through StudentEvents, I saw that Airbus was organizing an event for students. I was elated. I knew I had to do this.I got in touch with two of my friends, both aviation enthusiasts like me and we decided to start-off.

 

We were working together on such a project for the first time and I believe that the instant cohesion of our team was one of the main reasons we made it to the semi-finals of the event. This was also the first time that I got to work under a senior employee from the industry for a competition.Our team’s mentor, a highly experienced Airbus employee not only came across as an excellent and inspirational guide, but also as a model professional.

 

We were absolutely amazed by his ability of pinpointing the loopholes of our 5000-word report and presenting them in a very precise, yet articulate and convincing manner. By the end of the 9 and half months over which the competition spanned, I gained memories that would last a lifetime. What had actually started out as a task to build my resume actually turned into something much more than just that.

 

From our initial brainstorming sessions to eagerly awaiting our mentors feedback every time we sent him a draft of our proposal, I believe that the lessons that I have learnt from each phase of this competition will go a long way with helping me in my professional life.

 

 

 

 

 

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My Third Year Exchange


By Amy Bajurny (Queen’s University, Canada)

My experience abroad drastically changed my outlook as an individual, a Canadian and an academic.  My exchange experience at The University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia gave me the opportunity to travel and see world-renowned sites, meet inspirational people from dozens of countries, study at a new post-secondary institution, and explore a foreign lifestyle.  I can confirm that my character has developed for the better, into a self-assured, mature, ambitious Queen’s student; one who is willing to discover, learn from, meet, and share with anyone, anywhere. 

My exchange experience also allowed me to find a balance in my life as a scholar, and adult.  I was able to bridge the gap I formerly had in my mind as to where I would end up after graduation. From being immersed in a foreign, thriving city, I was able to better assess my traits and qualifications, understanding what I could see myself doing as a Stage and Screen graduate, in a large world, full of opportunities.

I believe Australia was the perfect country to help me find my place and purpose in society because I was exposed to so many new career ideas.  For example, I had the opportunity to attend the largest short film festival in the world, TROP Festival.  This helped me realize that I would love to become involved in the event planning of film festivals.  Consequently, I have been inspired to apply to event planning internships internationally, and throughout Canada.

My exchange really motivated me to take more risks in life and put myself out there.  With the encouragement and support of the International Programs office at Queen’s University, I was able to take a leap — and I landed on my feet.  My exchange was a crucial period of growth and reward, surely a life-changing adventure I am very thankful for and will never forget.

Editor’s Note: Have you ever studied abroad? Do you have experiences to share? If you’d be interested in writing tips for students please contact us at ambassadors@studentevents.com

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Meet Arush…


Position: Head Ambassador in India

Study Field: Bachelor in Engineering

Uni: Vellore Institute of Technology (VIT), India

Recently, it dawned upon me that I have just passed the halfway mark of my Bachelors course. This thought further instigated a session of self-reflection – a look back at all the memories, learning and occurrences that have shaped the most memorable two-and-a-half years of my life so far.

One thing that I noticed was that all these experiences had a common link that was instrumental in their realization – student events. Be it the competitions that have acted as an avenue to bridge the gap between the theoretical notions of my curriculum with relevant practicality or the conferences at which I have so often been left awe-inspired, it is without a shadow of doubt that I can affirm the positive contribution of student events in my undergraduate odyssey thus far.

“All these experiences had a common link… student events.”

Also, I have realized that some of the most inspiring moments in your life come through some of the most unexpected avenues. For example, it was at a conference on ‘sustainable lifestyles’ that I met an academic who enlightened me about this really cool concept called ‘design thinking’; a topic that I am now considering for my thesis. So next time you get the opportunity to get involved in a conference, competition or seminar, make sure that you go for it!

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Quote of the Day


Victory is won not in miles but in inches. Win a little now, hold your ground, and later, win a little more.

– Louis L’Amour

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Social Media Explained


Facebook comes naturally to most students. Most of us have had it for four or five years, and we’re so addicted to it that no amount  of physical human interaction will quell our compulsive need to check our newsfeed. But did you know that social media could lead to your future job? Did you know that there are all kinds of companies out there looking to hire you as a consultant to make their business prevalent online? Did you know that twitter isn’t just for absurd daily minute-to-minute updates on celebrity’s lives, but it can be the most important tool you use for your career search? Continue reading

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Student Unions


First off, apologies for the late post today. It’s been a pretty hectic weekend with lots of lovely and some not so lovely little adventures, but either way I hope you will forgive me and still enjoy this week’s post!

As some of you may or may not know I also work for Warwick Students Union as an Entertainments Representative (basically telling people where/when to party, wooo!).

Warwick SU is a non-profit organisation that is technically separate from the university but works very closely with it to enhance the “student experience”. To quote our motto, the union is “run by students, for students”. In the UK pretty much every university has a corresponding SU which is a great way for them to listen to their students’ voices and be able to improve their offering. On the other hand SUs are also a great way for students to get their voices heard about issues on everything from academia to living costs and social causes.

Our lovely Warwick SU Sabbatical Officers

SUs however have evolved far beyond just student-university liaison, as my job title can tell you. They are the central hub for university social life through managing all university Societies and Sports Clubs, providing student-priced cafés/pubs/restaurants/shops, entertainments through club nights, events and live concerts and much, much more. They also form the central student support system for non-academic issues, so basically anything from fixing your computer to counselling.

Here’s a link to our website if you want to have a look! http://www.warwicksu.com/

Personally I think SUs are something that the UK Higher Education system really got right, but I know not many countries (including my native Slovenia) have such a well organised and centralised system just for student well-being.

So I’m wondering, what kind of support systems do Unis in your neck of the woods have? Do they simply unleash you into the wilds of academia with nought but your cunning to protect you or is it a more centralised approach like in the UK? I really want to know!

Much love,

Martholio

P.S. Apologies for not replying to comments yet, been very busy but will get back to you before the day is over!

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From the Classroom to Consultancy #7


Catch-up with the previous episode here.

Our team nailed our client proposal presentation!

Both our module leader and our client were very pleased with both the delivery and content, except for one ‘slight’ comment to be made about the latter.

We had to outline our project plan, including our research methods and the feasibility of our solution. When it all came down to it, we had actually put too much on our plate! It’s a good thing our module leader pointed it out, because not only were we way over our heads in work, but also we now no longer need to wonder if we’re doing enough.

We’re In Over Our Heads!

We need to figure out two things:

1. How to narrow things down (tough because all the areas we have researched seem equally important!)

Sometimes it makes sense to do less and do it well, rather than take on more and run out of time.

2. Create a detailed schedule of what will be done – when, and by whom.

This will probably have to be done before we attempt anything else. That way each team member will be assigned a specific role in the group, ensuring we are better organized and our time is spent more efficiently and productively from now on.

Getting Started

We’ve talked to our clients,and now it’s time to kick-start our market research. Within days we will be joining in some form of activity, event, or service offered by the organisation. We will shadow the activities and briefly interview the participants in order to gain some insight. We will essentially try to uncover why there are less males than females among the existing service users for our clients and whether the users, especially the men, have any suggestions on how to address this situation.

Meanwhile, I’ll be working on my individual project plan (worth 10% of our overall grade) that’s due by the end of the month.

Do I vow to finish it ahead of time and not pull another all-nighter?

Not really, no, because let’s face it: Procrastination is part of being a student, right?

Barbara Oberc is a StudentEvents.com Campus Ambassador at the University of Newcastle in the UK! Each week she’s updating us on her progress through her epic final year management consultancy project!

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Importance of Sleep


Most students including myself underestimate the actual importance of sleeping. I often think that staying awake for several additional hours in the library will guarantee that I will get more work done. But this (unfortunately) is simply a delusion. Continue reading

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How to Succeed in Life Without Getting Ulcers


It has been no surprise that since the beginning of the “noughties,” technology has been integrated into every aspect of life to a level previously only entertained in the wistful looks of science fiction fans. The pace of our lives has sped up.

Keyboard

There is an unprecedented supply of information at our fingertips that we need to absorb to decide what we want to do with our lives. By the time we’re wrestling with the throes of puberty, we have to have already settled on one career choice from thousands of possibilities; all so that we can take the right classes in high school, study the right subject at university, and ultimately land our coveted dream job.

Recruitment

For a student and potential entrant into the UK job market, the pressure is on to live that ideal. Competition is fierce, with employers looking for the best of the best across the globe, so whatever you decide to study, you have to do it “guns blazing” to stand a chance.

But how can we know we’re making the right decisions? And even when we know what we want, how can we run the gauntlet of CVs and interviews? Continue reading

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Your 5 Steps to Networking Success


Networking is finding the right people with the right resources and having them help you get the word out.

Right people + Right resources = Success

By yourself, you are nowhere near as effective as when you have a network of contacts and friends working together to help promote you or your new venture. Networking is as easy as making new friends. If you can make new friends, then you can network. But making new friends does take work. It’s not magic.Build your Network in 5 easy steps!

How do we do this? Let’s break it down into 3 important sections:

  • Identify your value
  • Build your network
  • Leverage your network

IDENTIFY YOUR VALUE

Step 1: Make Yourself Valuable by Helping Others

Make it a point to provide helpful information / advice / support to at least one person each day. This is a major stumbling block for people because of the personal investment it requires, but once you realize the multiplier effect that’s attached to each of your efforts, you will be surprised at why more people aren’t doing this.

Attributes of Service posted on a bulletin board with pushpins

Just help others. Quite often you’ll hear people voicing their concerns in public forums or even on twitter. If it takes a few minutes of your time to point them in the right direction, do it right there and then.

Summary: You have to prove your value to people who are vastly more influential than you – this translates into building your own worth by playing with the smaller fish first. It’s a step-by-step process. Continue reading

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From the Classroom to Consultancy #5


Let’s begin with the Good.

I was able to amend my train ticket, ensuring that I won’t miss my upcoming presentation. I’m happy to report that our team has been getting along very well. But while clicking with the team is essential, it’s establishing a good relationship with the client that is the most crucial. This is where I’ll be moving on to the Bad…

We don’t have a ‘bad’ relationship – we just don’t have one at all! It’s been 2 weeks since we were appointed as the client’s management consultancy team, and so far our (one-sided) correspondence has consisted of:Communcation Problem

  • An unanswered first e-mail
  • An unanswered chase e-mail
  • Put on hold when calling them directly
  • Getting through and then told that they’re unavailable and will get back to us by the end of the next day
  • Them not getting back to us by the end of the next day.

Let’s just say that the lesson learned this week is:

If you’re not getting paid, you’re not a priority. Continue reading

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